Saturday, March 16, 2013

the courtship and marriage of Reynold & Bernice


 


gleaned from a letter Dad wrote to grand-daughter Jennifer:
 

Rice Street Car at Ivy St.
"Did you know I met her by monkey island in Como Park, and walked her home, three blocks east of Rice Street on Maryland Ave., about three miles".

 
 
the courting route Reynold and Bernice
 
 
 "Courting?  Having no car I rode the street cars from
Southwest of town almost to South St. Paul. "


Jackson Street car passing the Gt. Northern RR at Pennsylvania

"In those days Rice Street boys took a dim view of a 'foreigner' from going with their girls.  So I would take the Rice Street car out there and Jackson Street car home.  Saved a few bloody noses."
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 







"In 1938 I was married to a Catholic girl.  Although neither of our families were happy about us marrying outside of our denominations, they did not interfere.  We were married in a Catholic parsonage [St. Bernards] instead of the church. "









 




 
In 1939, Reynold and Bernice are living at 65 Garfield St.  Reynold's occupation is listed as apprentice at American Hoist and Derrick. 




In 1941, Reynold and Bernice are  living at 1001 Matilda St.  Reynold's occupation is listed as machinist at American Hoist and Derrick. 


1001 Matilda St.



Thinking about the name Bernice which has no connection, as far as I know, to the family.  And what was the influence of popular culture on these young Austro-Hungarians moving off the farm to the city.  Were they reading the popular magazines?  Were they aware of  F. Scott who continued to mine his St. Paul up-bringing for his best selling short stories and novels.

"Bernice Bobs Her Hair" is a short story by F. Scott Fitzgerald, written in 1920 and first published in the Saturday Evening Post in May of that year. It appeared shortly thereafter in the collection Flappers and Philosophers.


 

next time: the move and home ownership at 711 Parkway Dr.